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The Hindu Editorial Analysis | 29th June’20 | PDF Download

 

Making sense of China’s calculations

  • June 15, Galwan heights: a direct confrontation lead to fatal casualties.
  • Policy planners, both in Delhi and Beijing feared this the most.
  • Highest number of casualties since 1967.
  • Chinese post in Galwan are getting bigger in size.
  • New and fractious phase in China-India relations.
  • From now on it will be “new and different normal
  • China’s reaction has been consistent — India must move out of Galwan.
  • Today’s situation is different from Depsang (2013), Chumar (2014) and Doklam (2017).
  • Point 14 gives China a virtual stranglehold over the newly completed, and strategically significant, Darbuk-Shyok-Daulat Beg Oldie Road, which leads on to the Karakoram Pass.
  • Ambiguity has existed regarding the Line of Actual Control (LAC) in this sector.
    1. Chinese “claim line” is that of November 1959
    2. For India the LAC is that of September 1962
  • China has consistently asserted its claims over the whole of Aksai Chin and successive administrations from our side have chosen to overlook China’s more recent postures.
  • Importance of Aksai Chin for China: it provides direct connectivity between two of the most troubled regions of China, viz., Xinjiang and Tibet.
  • Home Minister Amit Shah’s statement on Aksai Chin.
  • Questions are now being raised about the failure of intelligence.
  • Inadequate appreciation of what the build-up meant
  • Failure to decipher China’s intentions.
  • Principal responsibility for intelligence assessment and analysis
    1. National Security Council Secretariat (NSCS)
    2. Decision of the NSCS to dismantle the Joint Intelligence Committee has contributed to a weakening of the intelligence assessment system.
    3. R&AW: lack of domain expertise, and an inadequacy of China specialists.
  • India’s Summit diplomacy has tended to marginalise the External Affairs Ministry with regard to policy making, and we are probably paying a price for it.

Brief reprieve

  • Financial Action Task Force has decided to grant Pakistana three-month extension on fulfilling commitments.
  • June 2018: Pakistan came under GREY LIST
  • October 2019 deadline: to complete a 27-point action plan on countering terror finance and anti-money laundering.
  • Black list: high-risk jurisdictions and has to face severe financial sanctions.
  • Pak has only completed about 14 points so far.

  • U.S. report on terrorism: Pakistan remains a “safe haven” for most UN proscribed groups.
  • Its steps to prosecute certain leaders of JeM and LeT are inadequate.
  • Imran Khan’s reference in its Parliament to al-Qaeda founder Osama Bin Laden as a “martyr” underlines the establishment’s attitude to these groups.
  • Pakistan’s failed attempt to have the UNSC designate four Indians as terrorists last week — it was vetoed by the U.S. — speaks to its lack of credibility on the issue.

Letter and spirit

  • Fragmented citizenship rights.
  • Group of two to three lakh people, is made up of refugees from Pakistan, sanitary workers resettled from other parts of India and Gorkhas who arrived as soldiers before Independence.
    1. Denial of opportunities to them in education, employment and politics.
  • The erstwhile State of J&K gained special powers to define its ‘permanent residents’ and restrict land, educational and employment rights only to them.
  • As per the new domicile rules, those persons and their children who have resided for 15 years in J&K, or have studied for seven years and appeared in the Class X or XII exam in an educational institution in the UT, are eligible for grant of domicile.
  • The changes will enable many others currently living in J&K to get domicile and associated rights.
  • A more uncharitable interpretation is that a deliberate scheme to change the demographic character of the region is unfolding.
  • Valley-based parties, National Conference and the People’s Democratic Party, have reiterated their opposition to the changes.
  • Movement of people across political and natural borders has been a constant feature of progress.
  • Economic growth and vitality of a society often positively correlate with its openness towards the outside world.
  • Communities that are not equipped to negotiate with unfamiliar market and cultural forces need some insulation.

IN-SPACe

  • To enable India to expand its footprint in the $360 billion space market, the government last week said a regulatory body called the Indian National Space Promotion and Authorisation Centre (IN-SPACe) will be established.
  • It’s expected to encourage private participation.

Will IN-SPACe affect the functioning of Isro?

  1. Won’t affect Isro’s functioning, fourth vertical under the department of space.
  2. Currently, Isro is one vertical under which there are so many centres, then the second vertical is of autonomous bodies and the third one is the public sector entity New Space India Ltd (NSIL).
  3. IN-SPACe will be a totally autonomous body, which won’t be influenced by Isro and it won’t influence Isro’s work.
  4. It will have its chairman, directorate and cadre.

Will IN-SPACe’s decisions be binding on Isro?

  1. When a private company makes a demand before IN-SPACe for either using testing facilities or systems of Isro, the nodal agency will talk to the respective Isro centres for providing the facility to the company.
  2. Once IN-SPACe has made a decision on an application in consultation with Isro, then that decision will be binding on Isro and other stakeholders.
  3. So, only the mission-specific IN-SPACe’s decision will be binding.

As per space reforms, private sector will now play a big role in the space sector. How?

  1. Till now, private players or a consortium of companies had been making and supplying components of rockets and satellites to Isro.
  2. Now, private companies can produce their own satellites and rockets and use Isro’s launch facility to launch them for a fee.
  3. So, the private players will be involved in a project from start to finish.
  4. This will spur commercialisation of satellite and rocket manufacturing and revolutionise the entire process, which till now was confined to Isro.
  5. Students can make mini-satellites and can launch them from Isro facilities and we can give them a concession.

What’s your overview of new space reforms?

  1. It’s an excellent initiative and has come at the right time.
  2. Right now, India’s contribution in the $360 billion space economy is just 3%.
  3. The reforms will bring drastic changes in the space sector.

Why can’t we have a common policy in the space sector?

  •  Each application has a different characteristic.
  • Satcom, Remote sensing and Navigation.

Kartarpur bridge

  • Spv vs Spy row
  • Delhi asked the Pakistan High Commission to reduce the strength of its diplomatic mission in India by half, announcing that it would do the same at its mission in Islamabad.
  • Pakistan’s offer to reopen Gurdwara Darbar Sahib at Kartarpur from today for Indian pilgrims on the occasion of Maharaja Ranjit Singh’s death anniversary.
  • MEA has said two days is too short a notice, and it looks like a “mirage of goodwill”.
  • Kartarpur Corridor” agreement is a rare India-Pakistan agreement.
  • Accepting Pakistan’s Kartarpur offer would help to keep one bridge with Pakistan intact.
  • India’s intention and determination to keep its relations with the two countries separate despite their apparent efforts to make common cause over Ladakh and Kashmir.
  • Pakistan probably expects India to spurn the offer.

NEWS

  • Prime Minister Narendra Modi has said that self-reliant India will be a real tribute to our martyrs.
    1. Mr Modi said every Indian should resolve to make the country stronger, more capable and self-reliant.
    2. The Prime Minister said, no mission can be successfully achieved without people’s participation.
    3. Mr Modi said, when people buy local, become vocal for local they play a role in strengthening the country.
    4. Prime Minister said, the entire country is paying tributes to the valour and bravery of our soldiers who were killed in Ladakh and is indebted to them.
    5. Mr Modi said that the world has noticed India’s commitment and might when it comes to safeguarding its sovereignty and territorial integrity.
  • Home Minister
    1. Amit Shah has asserted that India is going to win challenges on both the fronts – the one against COVID-19 and the standoff along LAC with China in Eastern Ladakh.
    2. In Jammu and Kashmir, three terrorists were killed in an encounter with security forces in Anantnag district this morning.
  • Assam
    1. There is no respite in floods as new areas have been inundated.
    2. Over 9 lakh people are affected in 23 districts.
    3. 20 persons lost their lives so far in the current wave of floods.
    4. Dhemaji, Tinsukhiya, Dibrugarh , Nalbari and Barpeta are among the worst affected districts.
    5. NDRF and SDRF teams have rescued around 10 thousand people during last 24 hours.
    6. Around 20 thousand people are taking shelter it relief camps.
  • Home Minister Amit Shah has taken stock of the situation in Brahmaputra river and landslides near Guwahati.
    1. Mr Shah spoke to Assam Chief Minister Sarbananda Sonowal and senior minister Himanta Biswa Sarma.
    2. He assured them of all possible help to the state. Mr Shah said the government at centre stands firmly with the people of Assam.
    3. Home Minister also spoke to Bihar Chief Minister Nitish Kumar and enquired about the rising water level in Mahananda river.
    4. In a tweet, Mr Shah said, he assured Nitish Kumar of all help from the central government for the safety of the people of the state.
    5. Uttar Pradesh is facing locust problem in many districts since large group of locusts have attacked in eastern and western parts of the state.
  • The government has again extended the deadline to bid for Air India by two months till 31st August.
    1. This is the third time the deadline has been extended.

 

 

 

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