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Yojana Magazine Analysis August Part 1 2020 – Free PDF Download

 

Contents – Part I

  • Philosophical Nature of Indian Music
  • Unique identity of North East Region

Content – Part II

  • Maharashtra – Diverse & Vibrant
  • Gujarat – Culture – A unifying Force
  • Tamil Nadu – Temple Inscriptions
  • Jammu & Kashmir – Memorial Stones

 

Indian Music = Spirituality

  • The Indian  classical  music,  be  it  Hindustani  or  Carnatic,  has  essentially  got  a  spiritual  component inherent in it.
  • But Why?

 

Why Spirituality in Music?

  • Temples provided a platform where these arts flourished.

  • Bhakti movement focussed on selfless devotion with many saying music as connecting link.
  • Indian classical  music  are  formulated  and  structured  in  such  a  way that  it  becomes  an  inward  journey for find god within.

 Whats the proof of that Spirituality?

  • Nadopasana
  • Nadopasana’ means ‘worship ( upasana ) through music.
  • Guru-Shishya Parampara
  • Gharana tradition

 

Lets talk about different forms

Lets talk about different forms

Music & Painting connection

  • A typical example of the amalgamation of Indian classical music with visual art and poetry was the evolution of Ragamala (‘garlands of musical modes’) painting series of medieval India.
  • It is a form of Indian miniature painting that depicted various Indian musical modes or Ragas.

 Music & Painting

Learning through Pictures

 The Extras  

  • What’s SPIC MACAY?
  • SPIC MACAY (Society for the Promotion of Indian Classical Music And Culture Amongst Youth) is a non-political, nationwide, voluntary movementfounded in 1977.
  • The movement was founded by Dr Kiran Seth who was awarded the Padma Shri for his contribution to the arts in 2009.
  • It is a participatory student movement registered under the Societies Registration Act, 1860.
  • Its intention is to enrich the quality of formal education by increasing awareness about different aspects of Indian heritage and inspiring the young mind to imbibe the values embedded in it.
  • It is supported nationally by the Ministry of Culture, Ministry of Youth Affairs and Sports, and the Ministry of Human Resource Development.
  • In 2011, it was awarded the Rajiv Gandhi Sadbhavana awardin recognition of its contribution to youth development.

The Extras

  • The Hindustani Music
  • Both Hindustani & Carnatic music have roots in Bharata’s Natyasastra but,they diverged in the 14th
  • The Hindustani branch of music focuses more on the musical structure and the possibilities of improvisation in it.
  • The Hindustani branch adopted a scale of Shudha Swara Saptaka.
  • The Hindustani music has elements of ancient Hindu tradition, Vedic philosophy and Persian traditionas well.
  • Since ancient times, it has been passed from one to another through the Guru-Shishya Parampara.

 

The Extras – Dhrupad

 

The Extras -Khayal

 

The Extras – Thumri

 

The Extras – Tappa

  • In this style the rhythm plays a very important role as the compositions are based on fast, subtle and knotty constructions. There is Great use of very quick turn of phrases.
  • Tappa developed in the late 18thCentury from the folk songs of camel riders of North-West India.

 

The Extras

 

The Extras

  • Carnatic Music
  • Carnatic music owes its name to the Sanskrit term Karnataka Sangitamwhich denotes “traditional” or “codified” music.
  • It is composed of a system of Ragam(Raga) and Thalam (Tala), it has a rich history and tradition.
  • Both Hindustani & Carnatic music have roots in Bharata’s Natyasastra but, they diverged in the 14th century.
  • Both the terms emerged for the first time in Haripala’s “Sangeeta Sudhakara”,written in the 14th century A.D.
  • Purandardasis considered to be the father of Carnatic music (Carnatic Sangeeta Pitamaha).

 

The Extras

  • Carnatic Music
  • Carnatic music, from South India is rhythmically intensive and more structured than Hindustani music.
  • For instance, Carnatic has logical classification of ragas into melakartas.
  • Carnatic raga elaborations are generally much faster in tempo and shorter than their equivalents in Hindustani music.

 

The Extras

 

The Parameters

  • Languages
  • Religion & Faiths
  • Festivals
  • Fabrics

The Language

 

The Language – Extras

 

The Language – Extras

 

The Faith

The Faith – Extras

 

The Festivals

  • Assam
  • Bihu, the  most  popular    It  has  its  roots  in  agrarian  practices
  • Bhogali Bihu 
  • Rongali Bihu
  • Kongali Bihu
  • The Bodos call their New Year festival Baisagu, the Dimasas call it Busu, the  Karbis  call it Rongker, the Mishings call it Ali-aye-Lrigang, and the Rabhas call it Baikho.

The Festivals

  • Meghalaya
  • The Garos celebrate Wangala
  • The Khasis celebrate Shad Suk Mynsiem
  • The Jaintias celebrate Behdeinkham
  • Mizoram
  • All three festivals— Chapchar Kut, Mim Kut and Pawl Kuft-are related to agriculture, during which the Mizos perform Cheraw, the amazing bamboo dance.

 

The Festivals

  • Arunachal Pradesh 
  • The Adi  community  celebrates  Solung
  • The Apatanis  celebrate  Dree
  • The Niyishis celebrate Nokyum
  • The Galos celebrate Mopin
  • The Monpas celebrate Losar
  • All are related to agriculture.
  • Nagaland
  • Tribe-wise festivals  are —  Sekrenyi  (Angami),  Aoling  Monyu  (Konyak),  Moatsu  (Ao), Tuluni (Sema), ZJokhu Emong (Lotha) and Amongmong (Sangtam).

 

The Festivals

  • Manipur
  • Cheiraoba is the Manipuri New Year festival.
  • Lai Haraoba  is celebrated to appease the sylvan deity called Umanglai.
  • Yaoshang is the wonderful week-long Holi festival.
  • Rath Yatra, also called Kang Chingba, is a nine-day chariot festival dedicated to Lord Jagannath.

 

The Extras

  • Rangkholi – Meghalaya
  • Rangkholi or ‘Tiger Festival’ is a religious festival celebrated by the people of Nongtalang village in the War-Jaintia region of Meghalaya.
  • As per tradition, whenever any person from the village catches a tiger or its feline like, rituals have to be performed. The festival is mainly held in the month of January to March.

The Extras

  • Chokri Naga Folk Songs – Nagaland
  • The Chokri community is a sub community under the tribe Chakesang (Naga).
  • They cherish the folk song culture as their proud heritage.

The Extras – Sowa Rigpa

 

The Fabric

  • Assam has the highest number of handlooms in the country.
  • Assam is also home to the unique muga or golden silk—a variety of wild silk geographically tagged to Assam.
  • In Assam, people commonly weave mekhela-chador, while the ceremonial set also includes a riha.
  • Bodo tribal women of Assam weave the dokhona and jwmgra that constitute a woman’s traditional dress, while the aronai is a beautiful scarf worn by men.
  • Most common handloom products of the Mishing tribes are sumpa and galuk, a two-piece dress for women, while Rabha women weave khanbung and riphan.

The Fabric

  • In Manipur
  • Meiteis produce the phanek
  • Tangkhuls make kasan
  • In Arunachal Pradesh
  • Apatani women weave bilanabi, chinyu-abi and jig-jiro
  • Singpho women sew pukang
  • Nyishi women weave par-ij
  • Khamti women weave siu-pashao

The Fabric

  • Naga tribes
  • The Ao shawl is called tsungkotepsu
  • The Angami shawl is called loramhousho.
  • Mizoram
  • Varieties of the puan—a drape and uncut rectangular cotton cloth with tualhlohpuan and punchei

 

 

 

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